Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

Abstract Title:

Prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and rapid weight gain and overweight in infancy.

Abstract Source:

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Aug 20. Epub 2013 Aug 20. PMID: 23963708

Abstract Author(s):

Damaskini Valvi, Michelle Ann Mendez, Raquel Garcia-Esteban, Ferran Ballester, Jesús Ibarluzea, Fernando Goñi, Joan O Grimalt, Sabrina Llop, Loreto Santa Marina, Esther Vizcaino, Jordi Sunyer, Martine Vrijheid

Article Affiliation:

Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Hospital de Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract:

Objective: To examine the effects of prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on rapid growth in the first 6 months of life and overweight at 14 months of age. Design and Methods: In a Spanish birth cohort study, the POPs dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs - congeners 153, 138, 180) were measured in maternal serum collected in the first trimester of pregnancy during 2003-2008. Rapid growth was defined as a z-score weight gain>0.67 SD between 6 months of age and birth. Overweight at 14 months was defined as a BMI z-score≥the 85(th) percentile. Generalized linear models examined the association between POPs and rapid growth (N=1285) and overweight (N=1198). Results: The analysis population included 24% rapid growers and 30% overweight infants. DDE and HCB were positively associated with rapid growth and with overweight. There was some indication that infant sex and exclusive breastfeeding duration may modify the effects of DDE, and that maternal prepregnancy BMI status may influence the effects of HCB. PCBs were not related to postnatal growth. Conclusions: Prenatal exposure to DDE and HCB may be associatedwith early postnatal growth. Further research is needed to evaluate the persistence of these associations at older ages.

Study Type : Human Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.